10 Replies Latest reply: Oct 2, 2017 5:03 PM by sehen2030 RSS

    world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty

    C4D Connoisseur
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      During the week of the 2nd annual youth summit, one of 50 other events was the tedx to end poverty. TEDx WBG: Exploring the theme of ending poverty

       

      I will be making transcripts of each of the talks starting with pop star Dbanj who also celebrated his day at the world bank to sneak the launch of his Apple ambassadorship for the Beats headphone brand

       

      I would love to hear from anyone who sees ways to scale collaborations around any of these transcripts either post in this discussion or chat with me chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

      BELIEVE IN YOURSELF Believe in yourself | D'Banj | TEDxWBG - YouTube

      =============================

      I am Dbanj, and I am from Africa

      I know you are thinking huh - that dark continent those backward people

       

      Well I'm an entertainer, before I entertain you I would like to tell you a story about that Africa and how we used music to touch , inspire and empower our community

       

      Yes the title of my story is Believe in Yourself

       

      So around late last year an organisation called One campaign owned by Bono approached me, and said DBanj I want you to champion a movement in 2014. I said wait: am I going to meet Bono. They said if you believe. I said Oh I believe - sign me up - what do I have to do>

       

      They say to me DBanj do you know that growth in agriculture is 11 times more effective at reducing poverty than any other sector? I said no- what about oil and gas. They said yes agriculture- so I said i want to be educated. I want to know what to do

       

      So they took e on a three and half hour drive in Ghana. Well I have been to Ghana many times to perform in beautiful places but this was bad roads, no water  ...when I reached there they said this is one of the biggest cocoa plantation.. I said no way. I got talking to the small scale women farmers, I got to realise that in Africa = most of the uncultivated land left in the whole world is in Africa to do agriculture. So I said wow it s very important to us to unravel that hidden wealth

       

      So I called upon my colleagues 18 of us. from 11 Afican countries and we did a song called coconut chocolate.. We did it because we wanted the farmers to know they are not alone, wanted them to know that agriculture can be trendy, very classy and you be a farmer and become wealthy

       

      We didnt stop there. We said we want to sign a petition, We want over 500000 youth to sign this petition that our african leaders know that youth are involved now., and if we're involved what you need to do is to commit at least 10% of the annual budget to agriculture so that we can end [poverty.. I was the first to sign that petition in Addis Ababa , and I am telling you that in 4 months we got over 2 million youth signing the petition -that agriculture id the way, the bedrock of our foundation and if we focus on it we can end poverty

       

      I am telling you for me personally my dream came true. I got to meet the legend Bono. And it didnt end there: at the just concluded african summit all the afican leaders signed petition to commit 10% of the annual budget.on agriculture. So yes as I say to you through music we touched, we inspired and we empowered our community because we believe.

       

      In conclusion, I am just this African youth, small boy from Lagos that believed in himself, that I can take this dream i believed in my passion , and so now what we started is why we are here: I am proud to tell you that if African youth are the future of Africa and Africa is the future of the world then I say it is important for us to empower youth, to educate youth so that when we know we not only end poverty but we eradicate hunger and are able to feed ourselves and the rest of the world. Now let me entertain you

      =================================

      I hope to post transcript of jim kim tedx within 24 hours - meanwhile the youtube is at Will the poor always be with us? | Jim Yong Kim | TEDxWBG - YouTube

        • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
          C4D Explorer

          I am proud to be an African

          #proudlyNigerian#

            • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
              isabellawm C4D Connoisseur

              I dream that one day the world bank will help every youth to be as proud of their boirth home as Dbanj makes you be from Africa

              and Jim Kim is from Korean USA- here's the start of his tedx  (more soon once dad has done his transcription-homework)

               

              Will the poor always be with us? | Jim Yong Kim | TEDxWBG - YouTube

              Jim KIm :

               

              I came to this country (USA) when I was 5 years old. My father was a dentist and my mother, who  is still alive, is a philosopher. My father was one of the most practical people on earth - Korean dentists are the most practical people on earth. !

               

              My  mother, on the other hand as  a philosopher, interested me at an early age to the writings and work and life of Martin Luther King. She woukd always say to us I get the dad be practical thing but you know you have got to live your life as if for eternity. So she always filled our head with the best ideas and taught us that we had a responsibility to the world. We left a wore-torn country, my parents were both refugees from the war; we were one of the very very fortunate Korean families to have opportunities with education, so she always said you have a responsibility to the rest of the world

                • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
                  C4D Connoisseur

                  Main Part 1 of Jim Kim Transcript from TEDX  Will the poor always be with us? | Jim Yong Kim | TEDxWBG - YouTube

                   

                  I came to this country (USA) when I was 5 years old. My father was a dentist and my mother, who is still alive, is a philosopher. My father was one of the most practical people on earth - Korean dentists are the most practical people on earth.

                   

                  My  mother, on the other hand as  a philosopher, interested me at an early age to the writings and work and life of Martin Luther King. She would always say to us I get the dad be practical thing but you know you have got to live your life as if for eternity. So she always filled our head with the best ideas and taught us that we had a responsibility to the world. We left a wore-torn country, my parents were both refugees from the war; we were one of the very very fortunate Korean families to have opportunities with education, so she always said you have a responsibility to the rest of the world

                   

                  So for most of my adult life I spent time in places like Haiti, and Peru in the prisons of Siberia , in Africa trying to provide healthcare. A very close friend and colleague of mine, Paul Farmer and I along with other friends founded an organisation called Partners in Health.

                   

                  At Partners In Health we lived by a very simple but difficult mission. We wanted to make a preferential option for the poor in Healthcare. Now what does that mean? For us, having had this amazing opportunity to study medicine and anthropology at some of the greatest institutions of highest education we felt that we had a deep responsibility to  bring the best of medical science to the poorest people.


                  Now we started off fairly straightforward, we wanted to build clinics and bakeries and really pretty simple things then what we found out was that we could actually do a lot more - . we could actually treat HIV, we could treat tuberculosis and we could even treat drug resistant tuberculosis.

                   

                  One year we stumbled upon a epidemic of Drug Resistant (DR) tuberculosis in the slums of Lima Peru, 50 cases in a town of 100000 people which counts as an outbreak of DR tuberculosis.. DR Tuberculosis is one of the most difficult diseases to treat even in the best hospitals., its 18-24 months of treatments and for 12 months you have to give patients an injection 6 days out of 7 every week, Very difficult. But what we found was that these 50 cases were infecting others and transmissions was continuing so we had no choice .

                   

                  It turns out with tuberculosis that the only way to stop an epidemic is to treat those who are sick. So in other words from the human perspective is also te right thing to do from the public health perspective. Exactly the same problem we are facing today with Ebola.

                   

                  end of Jim KIm tedx script part 1

                  (PIH learning linksPartners In Health GHD  http://www.pih.org/knowledge-center  ... Haiti to Be World's First OPne University of Health? )

                   

                  chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk writes:

                  I wanted to break in here to suggest 2 ideas.

                  First if you have any other favorite transcripts of Jim Kim or Paul Framer of Sir Fazle Abed (the 3 greatest networkers to scale bottom up health services) - please add them in this discussion area.

                  Kim et all paper of transforming value chain of global health, Lancet 2013

                  Jim Kim2030nowjimkim2transcripts.doc 2030nowjimkim2transcripts.doc, 40 KB


                   

                  Second at this new  thread I would like to discuss ideas Sir Fazle Abed of BRAC quizzed with me about MOOC - while most people think MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Course or Curriculum - in my first of 3 chats about elearning with sir fazle abed of brac he asked me: if the other 3 letters MOO stand for the unique value multipliers of  being in the net generation why isn't C for Collaboration. And why not global health MOOC rock the world as  first most exciting viral celebration of post 2015 millennials

                   

                   

                  When I spent 2 hours walking the dog with Howard Rheingold (a bucket list activity if ever there was one as Howard lives just above the golden gate bridge in san francisco in area of extraordinary rural beauty but so near to one of youth's great future capitals) he said those who first coined MOOC preferred C for Collab too.

                   

                  I'll ask my daughter to post part 2 of Jim Kim Transcript (after a few good news sightings)

                  haiti farmer la mirebalais - Google Search

                  Are You Ready to Take It On? End Poverty by 2030

                   

                   

                  Mountains Beyond Mountains - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                    • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
                      isabellawm C4D Connoisseur

                      When my dad was a teen man believed in the race to the moon and got there, if all female teens (eg 1 2  3) believe we can end poverty then guided by healthy bankers like JYK we can get there: #2030now  #2025now #2018now #2015now -please invest in millennials' goals. Today's professionals 20-35 are the most connected, most educated, so why not the most collaborative open societies

                       

                      MILLENNIAL FUTURE-NOW -   BELIEVE IN OPTIMISM

                       

                      Part 2 of Jim Kim transcript

                       

                      But the thing we found which was so distressing is that it wasn't people would say you are nice guys and are trying to do the right thing but you are just being a little bit naive and maybe you should be doing something else. It wasn't that, it was people got angry with us. The head of the tuberculosis program in Peru at that time, who is now a very good friend of me, not only told us that we shouldn't treat Drug Resistant (DR) tuberculosis patients but if we treated a single DR tuberculosis patient he would kick us out of the country.

                       

                      So this all repeated itself when we started treating patients for HIV in Haiti. This was in 1998 ; the treatment had come out in 1996. We knew it could be effective but what we found  once again people were saying that the 25 million people living in Africa with HIV are not going to get treatment because it is too complicated, too hard.- and actually HIV is much simpler that treating DR tuberculosis! So leaders in  the global health community were saying you know the 25 million people infected in Africa with HIV, they are all dead. Now today 10 million people are in treatment., and part of it was due to efforts by many people. But at that time, we were suffering from low aspirations that we were projecting on to the poor. The poor themselves were not telling us I am sorry, don't treat me I am just not cost-effective. The poor were demanding treatment and yet our own low aspirations were impacting that. Now I am not saying it was easy. Every day we sat and thought , you know we have another problem with this program, and somebody somewhere in the world must have solved this , but we couldn't find those people

                       

                      When I came to the World Bank in July2012, this question haunted me. I walked through the door- on the wall it says our dream is a world free of poverty. Then the question for me was how long will it take for us to stop dreaming about this and actually put an end to poverty. Some people you can't do that, the poor you will always have with you.. But we beg to differ. About a year ago the governors of the world bank gave us a target : to end poverty by 2030 and boost shared prosperity for the bottom 40%. Now I continue to thank the governors of the word bank for having done this for us, because it forces us now to say ok if you want to end poverty by 2030 what are all the things you have to do to get there?  So we have had to change everything at the world bank group to ensure that we are fit for purpose, that we are ready to tackle this challenge.

                       

                      And so what are the things you need to do. The first thing you need is economic growth. Two thirds of all the people lifted out of poverty, have been lifted out of poverty because of economic growth. But its not just any kind of economic growth, it is economic growth that really helps the poor. So this is Bangladesh- in Bangladesh the world bank group has helped to page or build 3000 miles of roads.. So we did a study - those people who benefited from the road , what was their income over 6 years, and people in other parts of Bangladesh who did not have access to roads., what was their income? The people who benefited from new roads, their income rose by 74% ,and the people who did not have access to new roads so they could take their goods to market saw their income drop by 23%. Building roads is great, building roads where the poor can take their produce to market is even better and it has a dramatic impact- we need growth but it must be inclusive.

                       

                      Another thing we have learnt is that investing in people is critical. Larry Summers, former secretary of treasury,  just did a study that showed from 2000-2011 fully 24% of economic growth in low to middle income countries was a result of better health. This picture shows a Turkish baby. In Turkey in the middle of a horrific financial crisis, leaders said  we are going to invest in health at the most basic level primary health care -life expectancy in Turkey went up by 3 years, and infant mortality went down by 40%., and they grew at 5% during these years economically. We know that investing in people makes sense, but you have got to invest in a way that gives you better outcomes.

                       

                      In Tanzania we started a conditional cash program,. The great thing about this program is that the lessons came from elsewhere -Mexico (Oportunidades) Brazil  (Bolsa Familia) taught us that conditional cash programs can not only lift people out of poverty, they can spur economic growth. Do this by linking cash transfers to keeping kids in schools to making sure they are nourished and have regular healthchecks. This not only helps those people directly but boosts the economy, In Tanzania, last year The World Bank had 20000 houses covered and we decided why not scale this as it has been so effective; so. as of now we have 240000 households in the program, next year we will have a million households.

                       

                      Now is there any hope to ending extreme poverty?  Well in 1990m it was 36% but by 2000 it had dropped to 27%, by 2010 to 16%, next year it will be under 10%, but the last of the poor will be the hardest . These are people living in fragile and conflict-effected states, they are people who are suffering from disasters . this is going to be a very difficult struggle but if we boost economic growth in a way that helps the poor, if we invest in people, and share knowledge of what works - solutions across the world... I am very very optimistic.

                       

                      So, will the poor always be with us? No.

                       

                      World Bank Group Tedx ending poverty

                      Youtube versions

                      Next transcripts coming soon

                       

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                • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
                  isabellawm C4D Connoisseur

                  video of what jack ma says he learnt from knowledge sharing with Koby Bryant:

                   

                  question 1: which millennials networks (America, Asians, Africans) will learn most from social movement connecting with jack ma

                  YABT  wants all the publicity possible before during and after putting youth collaboration entrepreneurs at the central of the summit of americas april 6-11

                  question 2 : will you hurry up and post something dad- stop saying that last night's meeting at www.oas.org celebrating www.yabt.net was the best for millennials meeting you have ever attended and show us why -ok i hear that youth summiters who attended the americas millennials workshop hosted by luis and roby (social value world) V will know what you mean, but waht about the rest of us?

                   

                   

                  Luis Viguria

                   

                   

                  Chief Executive Officer - Young Americas Business Trust at Organization of American States

                   

                   

                  Previous
                  1. Organization of American States
                  Education
                  1. Tufts University - The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy
                  • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
                    tumerkis C4D Explorer

                    Thanks for sharing,

                     

                    Nice post.

                    • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
                      sehengratis20 C4D Explorer

                      I am proud to be an African

                      #proudlyNigerian#

                       

                       

                      • Re: world bank group tedx transcripts of ending poverty
                        sehen2030 C4D Explorer

                        And so what are the things you need to do. The first thing you need is economic growth. Two thirds of all the people lifted out of poverty, have been lifted out of poverty because of economic growth. But its not just any kind of economic growth, it is economic growth that really helps the poor. So this is Bangladesh- in Bangladesh the world bank group has helped to page or build 3000 miles of roads.. So we did a study - those people who benefited from the road , what was their income over 6 years, and people in other parts of november 2017 calendar Bangladesh who did not have access to roads., what was their income? The people who benefited from new roads, their income rose by 74% ,and the people who did not have access to new roads so they could take their goods to market saw their income drop by 23%. Building roads is great, building roads where the poor can take their produce to market is even better and it has a dramatic impact- we need growth but it must be inclusive.