Urban Transport Community of Practice

Discussion

  • 2Q Global Electrified Transport Market Outlook

    Ivan Jaques Goldenberg Posted May 30 2017, 3:22 PM

    2Q Global Electrified Transport Market Outlook from the latest BNEF newsletter.

     

    I was just in The Netherlands and was surprised that at Schiphol Airport the taxis are Tesla Model S!

     

    Best,

     

    Ivan

    ---------

     

    Global electric vehicle sales increased 37% in 1Q 2017 compared to 1Q 2016 and totaled 173,000 units, driven equally by growth in Europe, North America and China. Sales in North America increased the most year-on-year, as the region continues to respond very well to new EV model introductions. In Europe, sales of over 63,000 units meant that this region contributed the most to the total – 29%. As a result of a strong 1Q 2017, we now expect global sales in 2017 to exceed 1 million units.

     

     

    • In Europe, EV sales in four countries – Norway, the U.K., France and Germany – made up 74% of total sales in the region. EV sales were strong in the majority of countries we cover – EVs were only below 1% of total new car sales in four out of 16 countries. The success of the upgraded Renault Zoe, at over 9,100 units sold, shows the difference a single model can make and has led us to increase our forecast for the rest of 2017, when other mid-priced longer range BEVs like the Opel Ampera-e should be available.

     

    EV sales in China increased 40% year-on-year, despite the initial 66% drop in January 2017. Despite the cut in regional subsidies, China is on pace to sell over 430,000 EVs in 2017 – 54% more than in the previous year. Major Chinese car companies like BAIC and SAIC have ramped up their BEV offerings, showing broader market interest and leading to changes in the rankings there. BYD is no longer in the top three passenger EV manufacturers in China.

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  • D.C. launches the District Mobility Project. Find out how your commute compares to others.

    Ivan Jaques Goldenberg Posted Feb 14 2017, 8:27 PM

    Dear Colleagues,

     

    D.C. has recently launched an interesting urban mobility project. Description from the project's website:

     

    "The District Mobility Project responds to a request from the DC Council to assess the state of congestion for all surface modes in the District and identify actions to address that congestion. Broadening that vision, the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) sought to better quantify and qualify the state of its transportation system performance from a holistic multimodal perspective. This entails measurement of the transportation system’s congestion, reliability, and accessibility. That data is then used to identify near-term strategies and areas to focus on to help address mobility issues. As projects to address these issues are completed, their results will be assessed and new areas of need identified. This iterative process will allow the District Mobility Project to keep pace with the District’s evolving landscape."

    You can check the tool here.

     

    Could this be useful for our clients?

     

    Best,

     

    Ivan

    ESMAP 

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  • Cape Town 1st in World with Informal Transport Mapped

    Ivan Jaques Goldenberg Posted Feb 13 2017, 3:07 PM

    Dear Colleagues,

     

    I'm not sure that this claim for Cape Town is true, but nevertheless it is interesting because it tackles a very important issue in our client countries: how do you integrate informal transport, which in many cases accounts for the highest share in ridership.

     

    You can see the article here and the WhereIsMyTransport website here.

     

    Can you share good cases of successful integration of informal transport?

     

    Thanks,

     

    Ivan

    ESMAP

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  • e-Discussion - Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) - February 2017

    UT CoPTeam Posted Feb 07 2017, 8:25 PM
    • Transforming Transportation
    • eDiscussions

     

     

    Dear UT CoP members,

     

    To follow on the recent video on Mysore, the topic of this month is Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS).

     

    In order to kick-off our e-Discussion, I would like to mention a few points that could be addressed on this exchange:

     

    • ITS describes a technology applied to -but not limited to- transport and infrastructure with the objective to transfer information between systems and improve safety, productivity and reduce the environmental pollution.

       

    • ITS includes stand-alone applications such as traffic management systems, information, warning systems installed in individual vehicles, as well as cooperative ITS (C-ITS). The communication take place between vehicle to infrastructure or vehicle-to-vehicle.

       

    • One of the positive aspects is that ITS may contribute to reduce traffic, increase efficiency and may help alleviate the global warming.

       

    • What are the potential drawbacks of ITS? For instance, the vulnerability of the system to hacker’s attacks, malfunctioning of the system, privacy and the potential risk of misuse of information are among the one that comes to mind. There are many other concerns that we should consider listing.

      

    Starting from these premises, join the discussion in this thread where panelists from different fields provide online facilitation to answer your questions/comments.

     

    The e-Discussion is now active and will go on until February 28th.

     

    Please comment, raise questions, and connect with your peers. I hope you all enjoy the conversations!

     

     

     

    Best,

     

     

    UT CoP Team

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  • Just published: ITF Transport Outlook 2017

    Ivan Jaques Goldenberg Posted Jan 31 2017, 2:46 PM
    • Publications

    Dear Colleagues,

     

    The ITF Transport Outlook provides an overview of recent trends and near-term prospects for the transport sector at a global level, as well as long-term prospects for transport demand to 2050, for freight (maritime, air and surface), passenger transport (car, rail and air) and CO2 emissions. This edition looks at how the main policy, economic and technological changes since 2015, along with other international developments (such as the Sustainable Development Goals), are shaping the future of mobility, and presents alternative policy scenarios for long-term trends in transport demand and CO2 emissions from all transport modes, freight and passenger. A special focus on accessibility in cities also highlights the role of policies in shaping sustainable transport systems that provide equal access to all.

     

    You can download a copy from the OECD iLibrary here.

     

    Best,

     

    Ivan

    Energy Efficient Cities - ESMAP

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  • Welcome to join our Blockchain for Sustainable Development Global Roundtable Jan.7, 2017 Washington DC

    Xiaochen Zhang Posted Jan 06 2017, 7:35 PM

    Dear Friends,

     

    Welcome to join our Blockchain for Sustainable Development Global Roundtable Jan.7, 2017 Washington DC

     

    BTW, Xiaochen was interviewedby CCTV on China’s innovation process. Here is a clip:

    Xiaochen Zhang on China's innovation progress - Y...

     

    www.fintech4good.co 

    Xiaochen

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  • eDiscussion #7: Role of Integration in Transit Systems

    UT CoPTeam Posted Jun 24 2016, 5:59 PM
    • eDiscussions

    According to the World Bank Group, in the paper "Public Transport service optimization and system integration"


    The lack of integration in the public transportation system has long been a major complaint in passenger satisfaction surveys. To reach a destination, for example, a rider is often forced to take multiple routes, each with different schedules and transfer stations but without coordination on passenger information. As a result, the rider may have to take a long walk to make transfers and pay multiple fares. It also creates overlapping services and discourages ridership, according to the paper.

     

    “Public transport runs efficiently when it operates as a seamless, integrated system. This is particularly important in fast-urbanizing economies such as China and India, where public transport must increasingly compete with privately-owned cars,” said Ke Fang, a lead urban transport specialist of the World Bank and co-author of the paper.

    Last month, Ivan Jaques Goldenberg shared that  Mexico City is the most congested city in the world, according to TomTom Traffic Index Bangkok, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, and Moscow complete the top 5.  

    See the full list here TomTom Traffic Index

     

     

    How can Mexico leverage international good practices to improve its public transit system?

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  • Mexico City is the most congested city in the world, according to TomTom Traffic Index

    Ivan Jaques Goldenberg Posted May 20 2016, 1:51 PM
    • LUTP Spanish
    • LUTP

    TomTom has published its Traffic Index for 2016, and Mexico City tops the ranking of the world's most congested city. Bangkok, Istanbul, Rio de Janeiro, and Moscow complete the top 5.

     

    See the full list here TomTom Traffic Index

     

    TomTom Traffic Index.JPG

    (c) TomTom

     

    Next week (May 22-28, 2016) we will be in Mexico City for the Leaders in Urban Transport Planning (LUTP) workshop, discussing solutions. ESMAP's Energy Efficient Cities program is a proud supporter of LUTP.

     

    Best,

     

    Ivan

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  • Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis

    Ivan Jaques Goldenberg Posted Mar 09 2016, 3:18 PM

    Interesting article and video on the rise of electric vehicles and its impact on oil markets. What do you think about this?

     

    Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis

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  • Counterintuitive Ways to Reduce Vehicle Speeds

    James Markland Posted Feb 05 2016, 5:14 AM

    Dear colleagues

     

    I thought this article on techniques to reduce vehicle speed by making the road environment more complicated for drivers to be of interest.  The techniques are applicable primarily in urban areas or on roads that pass through smaller towns or villages.  How effective the techniques might be in places where drivers are less well trained or experienced, I do not know, but is a question that we should be able to answer.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/shortcuts/2016/feb/03/slow-down-traffic-ditch-kerbs-keep-potholes-plant-trees

    Perhaps more importantly, inverting the article, is the need to avoid those road design features that encourage high speeds in locations where vehicles should be travelling slowly.


    Look forward to hearing your thoughts

    James Markland 

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